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Antitrust and competition policy / edited by Andrew N. Kleit.

Contributor(s): Kleit, Andrew N.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Business economics ; 2 ; An Elgar reference collection. Publisher: Cheltenham : Elgar Reference Collection, 2005Description: xix, 641 pages :billustrations ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781843763192.Subject(s): Trusts, Industrial | Antitrust law -- Economic aspects | Competition | Industrial policyDDC classification: 338.85
Contents:
Part I: Monopolization Part II. Mergers Part III. Collusion Part IV. Vertical Restraints Part V. Predatory Pricing Part VI. Exclusionary Behaviour Part VII. Network Externalities Part VIII. Antitrust, Regulation, and Bureaucracy.
Summary: The antitrust litigation process is, to a large and perhaps surprising degree, driven by the underlying economic literature. The articles in this volume have been chosen to provide a sense of both the history and the current state of thinking about antitrust. The opening section considers the flaws in the 1960s view on monopoly. Part II then examines economic thinking with respect to mergers. The next three sections contain selections on three specific sets of practices that have been frequent targets of antitrust scrutiny. Part VI examines perspectives on exclusionary behaviour. Part VII studies the literature on network externalities, and the final part explores works in the area of bureaucracy and politics.
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Books Books Symbiosis Law School, Noida

                 

 

Reference 338.85 KLE.A (Browse shelf) Available SLSN-B-10309

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Part I: Monopolization
Part II. Mergers
Part III. Collusion
Part IV. Vertical Restraints
Part V. Predatory Pricing
Part VI. Exclusionary Behaviour
Part VII. Network Externalities
Part VIII. Antitrust, Regulation, and Bureaucracy.

The antitrust litigation process is, to a large and perhaps surprising degree, driven by the underlying economic literature. The articles in this volume have been chosen to provide a sense of both the history and the current state of thinking about antitrust. The opening section considers the flaws in the 1960s view on monopoly. Part II then examines economic thinking with respect to mergers. The next three sections contain selections on three specific sets of practices that have been frequent targets of antitrust scrutiny. Part VI examines perspectives on exclusionary behaviour. Part VII studies the literature on network externalities, and the final part explores works in the area of bureaucracy and politics.

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